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August/September 2016

Fettuccine

When prepared well, these long, wide noodles are greater than the sum of their short ingredient list, showcasing a clean flavor and a hint of springy chew. But which fettuccine should you buy?

How We Tested

Fettuccine is a simple product that’s been made with two ingredients—flour and water—for centuries. When prepared well, these long, wide noodles are greater than the sum of their short ingredient list, showcasing a clean flavor and a hint of springy chew. But which fettuccine should you buy?

Two major companies, Barilla and New World Pasta, control 50 percent of the American market. New World Pasta, which makes Ronzoni, also produces five popular regional pasta brands (Prince, American Beauty, Creamette, San Giorgio, and Skinner); we’ve learned in previous pasta tastings that they use the same formula to make them all. After weeding out the duplicates and smaller brands, we were left with only a handful of nationally available supermarket pastas that differ.

But just how drastic are those differences? To find out, we served fettuccine from four major brands to 21 America’s Test Kitchen staffers. Using the cooking times listed on the packages as a rough guide, we boiled the pastas until al dente and served them tossed with neutral-tasting canola oil and in our recipe for Fettuccine with Butter and Cheese.

Good news: Every product we tried was pleasantly springy with clean, subtly wheaty flavor. Though we know from previous pasta tests that drying time, temperature, and the type of machinery used to roll out the dough can all affect the pasta’s final texture and flavor, we found that the differences were minimal: You’ll get good results from any of the pastas we tested.

Still, as serious pasta nerds, we had some minor preferences. We gravitated toward wider, thicker noodles, which tasters deemed more substantial and chewy. Our favorites were up to 6.9 millimeters wide and 1.9 millimeters thick when cooked, while lower-ranked options were 5.4 millimeters wide and 1.6 millimeters thick.

One product in our lineup, from Ronzoni, was an outlier: Like most fresh (but not dried) fettuccine, it contains eggs (and is clearly labeled as “egg fettuccine”). While our tasters liked this pasta, we preferred the cleaner, less-distracting flavor of those pastas without egg. (We included this pasta because it’s the most widely available fettuccine from Ronzoni.) The Ronzoni fettuccine also comes in only a 12-ounce package—an inconvenience for our recipes, which usually call for a full pound.

Ultimately, Garofalo Fettucce emerged as our new winner. These wide, thick noodles were bouncy and springy, with just the right amount of chew. That said, there wasn’t a bad noodle in the bunch. Our advice when shopping for fettuccine: Choose pastas with shorter ingredient lists, buy what’s cheapest, and take pains to cook it well. We typically boil pasta in plenty of salted water—4 quarts of water per pound of pasta, unless a recipe specifies otherwise—and stir frequently to prevent sticking. The cooking times listed on packages are a good rough guide, but we also make sure to taste the pasta frequently while cooking: A minute can make the difference between pasta that’s perfectly al dente and pasta that’s mush.

Methodology

Twenty-one America’s Test Kitchen staffers sampled four top-selling, nationally available fettuccines cooked al dente and served tossed with canola oil and in our recipe for Fettuccine with Butter and Cheese. Sales data was obtained from IRI, a Chicago-based market research firm. Ingredients and sodium amounts were taken from nutritional labels. Thickness and width were measured using calipers and averaged across four cooked noodles per product to account for variability. Results appear in order of preference.

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The Results

Winner
Recommended

Design Trifecta 360 Knife Block

Admittedly expensive, this handsome block certainly seemed to live up to its billing as “the last knife block you ever have to buy.” The heaviest model in our testing, this block was ultrastable, and its durable bamboo exterior was a breeze to clean. Well-placed medium-strength magnets made it easy to attach all our knives, and a rotating base gave us quick access to them. One tiny quibble: The blade of our 12-inch slicing knife stuck out a little

Winner
Recommended

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.

Winner
Recommended

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.

Winner
Recommended

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.

Winner
Recommended

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.

Lodge Classic Cast Iron Skillet, 12"

Our old winner arrived with the slickest preseasoned interior and only got better. Broad enough to cook two big steaks, it browned foods deeply, and its thorough seasoning ensured that our acidic pan sauce picked up no off-flavors. Though its handle is short, the pan has a helper handle that made lifting easy. It survived abuse testing without a scratch. An excellent pan, at an excellent price, that you’ll never have to replace.