Cornell Chicken

From Cook's Country | August/September 2008

Why this recipe works:

Invented in the 1940s by Robert Baker, a Cornell University professor, this tangy, crisp-skinned grilled chicken recipe has been a star attraction at the New York State Fair ever since. Grilling two split chickens over gentle direct heat worked best here. To crisp the skin without burning it,… read more

Invented in the 1940s by Robert Baker, a Cornell University professor, this tangy, crisp-skinned grilled chicken recipe has been a star attraction at the New York State Fair ever since. Grilling two split chickens over gentle direct heat worked best here. To crisp the skin without burning it, we started the chicken skin side up to render the fat slowly, then flipped the chicken skin side down to brown it to a crisp. For the sauce, Dijon mustard contributed flavor and thickened it perfectly. We replaced the traditional poultry seasoning (which tasted dusty), with fresh rosemary and sage. The thicker sauce made for easier basting—we applied the sauce just three times during cooking. Less basting also meant crisper skin.

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Serves 4 to 6

Do not brine the chicken longer than 2 hours or the vinegar will make the meat mushy. Baste the chicken carefully in step 4, as any excess will drip onto the fire and flare up.

Ingredients

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