Tipsy Squire

Published December 1, 2005.

Why this recipe works:

Starting with a classic Southern rendition of trifle called Tipsy Squire, we wanted our recipe for this dessert to taste as good as it looked. For this trifle, we used stale sponge cake, which absorbs liquid without turning mushy. For deep fruit flavor without a watery texture, we used jam,… read more

Starting with a classic Southern rendition of trifle called Tipsy Squire, we wanted our recipe for this dessert to taste as good as it looked. For this trifle, we used stale sponge cake, which absorbs liquid without turning mushy. For deep fruit flavor without a watery texture, we used jam, not fresh fruit. Finally, we topped our Tipsy Squire with small almond macaroons for their bold flavor and crisp texture.

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Serves 10 to 12

The beauty of this trifle is that most of the components can (if not should) be made in advance. Once assembled, Tipsy Squire actually improves after an overnight stay in the fridge. You’ll need a 3-quart trifle dish to make this impressive dessert. Bake shops sell sponge cake in various sizes; just trim larger cakes to suit this recipe. To stale cake rounds, leave them uncovered on the counter overnight or place them on a wire rack over a baking sheet in a 200-degree oven for 3 hours.

Ingredients

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