Fat Separators

Published January 1, 2004. From Cook's Illustrated.

Overview:

Liquid fat must be separated from the drippings of a roast before making gravy or from a pot of hot stock before turning it into soup. Luckily, separating liquid fat is easy to do with a specially designed fat separator, aka gravy strainer or soup strainer. Three formats dominate the category: pitcher-type measuring cups with sharply angled spouts opening out from the base of the cup; ladles with slots around the perimeter; and "fat mops," brushes with long, soft bristles made from plastic fibers. Such extreme design differences raise the obvious question—which kind works best?

No matter what the specific design, fat separators work for two reasons. One, because fat and water do not mix—their incompatible molecular structures and electrical charges keep them apart—and two, because fat always rises above the liquid in the container—fat is less dense than water.

Five of the eight models we tested were essentially pitchers with the pouring spout set into their base, like the small watering cans used to reach houseplants in high… read more

Liquid fat must be separated from the drippings of a roast before making gravy or from a pot of hot stock before turning it into soup. Luckily, separating liquid fat is easy to do with a specially designed fat separator, aka gravy strainer or soup strainer. Three formats dominate the category: pitcher-type measuring cups with sharply angled spouts opening out from the base of the cup; ladles with slots around the perimeter; and "fat mops," brushes with long, soft bristles made from plastic fibers. Such extreme design differences raise the obvious question—which kind works best?

No matter what the specific design, fat separators work for two reasons. One, because fat and water do not mix—their incompatible molecular structures and electrical charges keep them apart—and two, because fat always rises above the liquid in the container—fat is less dense than water.

Five of the eight models we tested were essentially pitchers with the pouring spout set into their base, like the small watering cans used to reach houseplants in high spots. When the liquid settles in the container, you can pour it off, stopping just before the layer of fat floating on the liquid's surface reaches the opening for the spout. While all of the pitcher-type separators worked well, one feature that proved especially important was capacity. In general, we like large separators—usually around four cups—best. Large separators also have large mouths, which make for easier pouring when you're adding the stock to the separator. We also found an integrated strainer to be helpful when you're defatting pan drippings that are still mixed with chunks of aromatic vegetables, herb sprigs, or other flavorings. In terms of materials, the shock resistance of plastic is better suited to this tool than glass. During testing, one of the separators slipped out of our hands (which had gotten greasy from the fat) and fell to the floor. Had it been the glass model, we would have had to run out to buy a replacement.

Fat-separating ladles work when dipped just below the surface layer of fat that has accumulated atop the slightly cooled liquid. A series of slot-shaped holes along one side of the ladle allow fat to drain into the bowl of the ladle so it can be discarded. This procedure is repeated until as much fat as possible has been removed. Our testers found this to be a tedious process requiring fine control of the ladle. Frankly, skimming the surface fat with a wide, shallow spoon is just as effective and less frustrating.

Surprisingly, the cheesiest tool in the group, the Fat Mop, turned out to be pretty interesting. The mop head is made of plastic fibers that attract fat. As the packaging says, it is designed to defat stews, gravies, soups, chilis, and fried foods—items for which it would be impossible to use another kind of fat separator—as it sweeps across the surface to wick away fat. In our tests, it did in fact prove effective with chunky tomato sauce and pot-au-feu. Strictly speaking, however, the Fat Mop is not intended for use with large amounts of liquid. So, if we could have just one fat separator in the kitchen, our favorite version of the common pitcher-type would be our choice.

Methodology:

We tested eight fat separators and evaluated them according to the following criteria. If the design or capacity of a particular unit precluded it from a test, the result is listed as N/A. All of the separators were dishwasher-safe, and all emerged from the dishwasher clean and odorfree.

CAPACITY

This is the total amount the separator will hold and still operate properly.

PERFORMANCE

We simmered 1 gallon of canned low-sodium chicken broth with 10 ounces schmaltz (rendered chicken fat) for 30 minutes, allowed the mixture to cool for 15 minutes, and then used each separator to separate the fat from the liquid in two amounts (wherever applicable), 1 cup and 4 cups. Scores from these two tests were averaged to determine an overall performance rating.

HANDLE COMFORT

Tested with both bare hands and an oven mitt (fat separators are often used to defat very hot liquids, so many cooks protect their hands by wearing oven mitts). Secure, roomy, easily grasped handles were preferred.

EASE OF USE

Separators that were easy to pour liquid into, that poured liquid neatly and easily, and that had easy-to-read measurement markings were preferred.

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  • Product Tested

    Results Key:

    Good ★ ★ ★ Fair ★ ★ Poor
  • Prices are subject to change.
  • Highly Recommended - Winner

    Trudeau Gravy Separator with Integrated Strainer

    If it’s possible to get excited about a fat separator, this is the one to inspire enthusiasm. Its wide, oblong shape makes it easy to pour into, the integrated strainer is a great feature for pan drippings (although it would be even better with smaller holes), and an angled shield near the spout prevents accidental spillovers. Reasonably priced, too.

    • Ease of Use ★★★
    • Performance ★★★
    • Handle Comfort ★★★

    $16.99

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  • Recommended

    Pedrini Gravy Separator

    Extra-large capacity and a nicely integrated handle. Spout traps a tiny bit of fat at the tip, but not enough to affect the defatted liquid.

    • Ease of Use ★★★
    • Performance ★★★
    • Handle Comfort ★★★

    $14.99

    BUY NOW Amazon
  • Recommended

    East Hampton Industries Souper Strain

    This is the basic design that most cookware, discount, and hardware stores carry. Does a good job removing fat and pours neatly. Because the handle not attached at the bottom of the cup, as it is on similar models from competing brands, this model is marginally less stable when the cup is full.

    • Ease of Use ★★★
    • Performance ★★★
    • Handle Comfort ★★

    DISCONTINUED

  • Recommended

    OMI (Oil Mop, Inc.) The Original Fat Mop

    Defatting a large quantity of liquid was inefficient and tedious, but this tool works well on stews, sauces, and other chunky dishes. Does not clean up in dishwasher as thoroughly as the others, but it’s inexpensive enough to replace periodically without breaking the bank.

    • Ease of Use ★★★
    • Performance
    • Handle Comfort ★★★

    $4.99

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  • Recommended

    East Hampton Industries Gravy Strain

    Works as well as its big brother, but better suited to defatting drippings than a whole pot of stock because of its small capacity.

    • Ease of Use ★★★
    • Performance ★★★
    • Handle Comfort ★★★

    DISCONTINUED

  • Recommended

    Catamount Glass 2-Cup Fat Separator/Strainer

    Measurements are printed in dark ink, and are therefore much easier to read than those on all of the plastic models. Difficult to pour neatly when filled to capacity.

    • Ease of Use ★★★
    • Performance ★★★
    • Handle Comfort ★★★

    $16.95

    BUY NOW Amazon
  • Not Recommended

    WMF Profi Plus 11-inch Stainless Steel Fat Skimming Ladle

    The reason we wouldn’t recommend this unit is not that it’s a particularly bad ladle-style skimmer. In fact, with considerable patience and steadiness, it works fine. And that’s just it. Using a ladle requires considerable patience and steadiness, whereas using a cup-style separator does not.

    • Ease of Use
    • Performance ★★★
    • Handle Comfort ★★★

    $19.99

  • Not Recommended

    East Hampton Industries Skim It Fat Separator

    Because liquid is resistant to the broad, blunt base of this separator, it’s difficult to dip into the liquid with enough precision to control the flow of fat. In short, it’s hard to use. Designed to work with large quantities of liquid, so it wouldn’t work with drippings from a roast.

    • Ease of Use
    • Performance
    • Handle Comfort ★★

    DISCONTINUED

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