Nonstick Whisks

Published November 1, 2010. From Cook's Illustrated.

Overview:

We tested six brands in a variety of shapes, priced from $11.95 to $19.95, all coated with silicone to protect pans. As we made pastry cream and gravy and whipped eggs for scrambling, we quickly found that design often trumped efficiency. In one model, only the tip of the whisk was covered in silicone, leaving unprotected wire portions free to scratch the pan near the rim. Others had overly thick coatings, so that the fat wires were difficult to move through food. In the end, we found a lightweight, comfortable whisk with wires that were fully but thinly coated. Our winner whipped the rest of the field by being flexible yet resistant enough to make roux for gravy and pastry cream that didn’t curdle or stick, all without damaging our nonstick pan. While it wouldn’t necessarily replace our favorite conventional wire whisk for most applications, it’s an excellent tool for the nonstick aficionado.

We tested six brands in a variety of shapes, priced from $11.95 to $19.95, all coated with silicone to protect pans. As we made pastry cream and gravy and whipped eggs for scrambling, we quickly found that design often trumped efficiency. In one model, only the tip of the whisk was covered in silicone, leaving unprotected wire portions free to scratch the pan near the rim. Others had overly thick coatings, so that the fat wires were difficult to move through food. In the end, we found a lightweight, comfortable whisk with wires that were fully but thinly coated. Our winner whipped the rest of the field by being flexible yet resistant enough to make roux for gravy and pastry cream that didn’t curdle or stick, all without damaging our nonstick pan. While it wouldn’t necessarily replace our favorite conventional wire whisk for most applications, it’s an excellent tool for the nonstick aficionado.

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