Easier Eggs Benedict with ­Foolproof Hollandaise

From Cook's Country | February/March 2009

Why this recipe works:

Poaching eggs in a shallow skillet rather than a saucepan makes them easier to retrieve from the poaching water. And trying to get all the eggs into the pan at once can be a challenge. To ensure success, we cracked the eggs into four teacups and then tilted the cups to gently slide the eggs… read more

Poaching eggs in a shallow skillet rather than a saucepan makes them easier to retrieve from the poaching water. And trying to get all the eggs into the pan at once can be a challenge. To ensure success, we cracked the eggs into four teacups and then tilted the cups to gently slide the eggs into the boiling water all at once. We then moved the pan off heat; the gentle residual heat kept the whites intact and the yolks soft and runny. We developed an unconventional technique for hollandaise that required whisking butter and egg yolks on the stovetop in a double boiler. This method reversed the usual order of operations, which combines the yolks with water from the start. Mixing the yolks with butter created a stronger emulsion that was less likely to break during cooking. The resulting sauce is so stable that it can be chilled and reheated. We used a lot of water in this sauce and added the lemon juice off heat. The sauce is foamier than a classic hollandaise, but it holds without breaking for as long as an hour. It can also be refrigerated for up to three days and reheated in the microwave without breaking.

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Serves 4

An instant-read thermometer is essential to this recipe. For an accurate measurement of boiling water, bring a full kettle of water to a boil and then measure out the desired amount. Our favorite English muffins are Bays English Muffins.

Ingredients

Detail sfs eggs benedict with foolproof hollandaise 24
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