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Cooking Tips

Why You Should Cook Radishes

Raw? Naw. Sauté your radishes for mellower flavor.

Raw radishes have a kick. I happen to like that subtle spicy burn, but if you don’t (or if you just want a different radish vibe), there’s an easy work-around: Cook your radishes.

Cooking radishes is a simple way to mute their bark and enhance their sweetness. That's because heat degrades many of the compounds responsible for a radish's pungent, peppery flavor and concentrates its natural sugars.

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So if you don't think you like radishes, try cooking them. We love radishes braised, baked, and roasted, but we especially love the way sautéing concentrates their subtle sweetness. Here's how to do it.

How to Sauté Radishes

  1. To sauté radishes, first wash and quarter them (if your radishes are less than 1 inch across, you can just halve them).
  2. Melt a flavorful fat, such as butter or olive oil, in a skillet to add a bit of richness, as radishes are pretty lean.
  3. Then just sauté the radishes (with a bit of salt) in the skillet for about 10 minutes over medium heat, stirring halfway through cooking, until the radish pieces are lightly browned and crisp-tender.

Shopping for Radishes

Round red radishes (Cherry Belle or Scarlet Globe are the most common) are harvested in both spring and fall and store well, making them easy to find in markets year-round.

These radishes are best when they are smaller, about 1¼ to 1½ inches in diameter; larger ones may be tough, woody, and hollow. No matter what type of radishes you buy, ones with greens will be fresher.

Sautéed Radish Recipes

Sautéed radishes will taste great on their own, but here are a few ingredients and flavor pairings that will make them even better: