Beignets

From Cook's Country | February/March 2013
  • Shopping list
  • Print

Why this recipe works:

To replicate the airy, crisp texture and tangy yeast flavor of these classic New Orleans doughnuts, we began by using plenty of yeast and prodding it with warm water and sugar to start developing flavor right off the bat. A super-hydrated dough means lots of steam, which creates an open,… read more

To replicate the airy, crisp texture and tangy yeast flavor of these classic New Orleans doughnuts, we began by using plenty of yeast and prodding it with warm water and sugar to start developing flavor right off the bat. A super-hydrated dough means lots of steam, which creates an open, honeycombed structure as soon as the beignets hit the hot oil. Since wet dough is tricky to roll out, we let it rise in the refrigerator to firm it up. After a few minutes of frying and a shower of powdered sugar, our beignets were ready to be enjoyed, Big Easy–style.

less

Beignets

The city’s legendary doughnuts are light, airy, and delicate. If only we could make them at home. . .

Watch the Video

Makes about 2 dozen beignets

This dough is very wet and sticky, so flour the counter and baking sheet generously. You’ll need a Dutch oven with a capacity of at least 6 quarts.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup water, heated to 110 degrees
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon instant or rapid-rise yeast
  • 3 cups (15 ounces) all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 quarts vegetable oil
  • Confectioners' sugar

Instructions

  1. 1. Combine water, 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, and yeast in large bowl and let sit until foamy, about 5 minutes. Combine flour, remaining 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, and salt in second bowl. Whisk eggs and 2 tablespoons oil into yeast mixture. Add flour mixture and stir vigorously with rubber spatula until dough comes together. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate until nearly doubled in size, about 1 hour.

    2. Set wire rack inside rimmed baking sheet. Line second sheet with ­parchment paper and dust heavily with flour. Place half of dough on well-floured counter and pat into rough rectangle with floured hands, flipping to coat with flour. Roll dough into ¼-inch-thick rectangle (roughly 12 by 9 inches). Using pizza wheel, cut dough into twelve 3-inch squares and transfer to floured sheet. Repeat with remaining dough.

    3. Add enough of remaining 2 quarts oil to large Dutch oven to measure about 1½ inches deep and heat over medium-high heat to 350 degrees. Place 6 beignets in oil and fry until golden brown, about 3 minutes, flipping halfway through frying. Adjust burner, if necessary, to maintain oil temperature between 325 and 350 degrees. Using slotted spoon or spider, transfer beignets to prepared wire rack. Return oil to 350 degrees and repeat with remaining beignets. Dust beignets with confectioners’ sugar. Serve immediately.

Test Kitchen Technique: Forming Beignets

Our dough is very wet, a quality that allows a network of delicate holes to develop in the beignets. However, wet dough can be tricky to work with. Here’s how to easily shape and cut the beignets.

STOP STICKING: Dust the counter and rolling pin heavily with flour before you roll out the chilled beignet dough.

CUT INTO SQUARES: Traditionally, beignets are measured by the size of the cook’s hands: four fingers by four fingers. We cut 3-inch squares with a pizza wheel.

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection