Turkey In A Bag

From Cook's Country | October/November 2010

Why this recipe works:

While developing our Turkey in a Bag recipe, we discovered that scientists have found cooking in a brown grocery store bag to be potentially toxic. Fortunately, most supermarkets now sell ovensafe cooking bags. Wrapping the turkey in a bag, tossing in some veggies, and setting the pack in the… read more

While developing our Turkey in a Bag recipe, we discovered that scientists have found cooking in a brown grocery store bag to be potentially toxic. Fortunately, most supermarkets now sell ovensafe cooking bags. Wrapping the turkey in a bag, tossing in some veggies, and setting the pack in the oven resulted in flabby skin, waterlogged meat, and a pale bird. Setting both bird and bag on a V-rack prevented the turkey from stewing in its own juices. Excess liquid from the vegetables caused our elevated bag to tear from the weight. Moving the veggies out of the bag and into the roasting pan kept the bag intact. When we opened the bag toward the end of roasting time to crisp the skin, the breast meat quickly dried out. A protective shield of cheesecloth and aluminum foil protected the breast from the dry heat of the oven. The finished bird was delicious but looked pale and unappetizing. To help it brown, we reduced soy sauce on the stovetop, adding flour and butter to make a paste to rub on the bird.

less

Serves 10 to 12

We recommend a “self-basting” turkey (such as a frozen Butterball) or a kosher turkey. You will need a turkey-size oven bag and one 2-yard package of cheesecloth. Don’t let the oven bag touch the oven wall or it will melt. If you end up with less than 4 cups of defatted pan juices, supplement them with additional low-sodium chicken broth.

Ingredients

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection