Eggs Benedict

From Cook's Country | February/March 2009

Why this recipe works:

Seasoning the water with both salt and white vinegar was an essential first step for our Eggs Benedict. The vinegar flavored the eggs, helped to set the egg whites as they cooked, and prevented uneven, feathery whites. We used teacups to transfer the eggs to poach in the boiling water.… read more

Seasoning the water with both salt and white vinegar was an essential first step for our Eggs Benedict. The vinegar flavored the eggs, helped to set the egg whites as they cooked, and prevented uneven, feathery whites. We used teacups to transfer the eggs to poach in the boiling water. Cracking the eggs into the cups and gently sliding the eggs into the salted, acidulated boiling water ensured they remained intact.

We brought the water to a boil and added the eggs while it simmered. We immediately removed the pan from the heat, covered it, and allowed the eggs to sit for a few minutes. The gentle residual heat ensured the whites were tender and whole. This method produces restaurant-worthy poached eggs with soft, runny yolks and perfectly formed, round whites.

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Serves 6

The test kitchen’s favorite Canadian bacon is Applegate Farms. If you like, you can toast the English muffins and warm the bacon 20 minutes in advance. Reheat them in a 200-degree oven just before serving.

Ingredients

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