Aprons

Note: Cook's Country continuously updates our equipment reviews and taste tests. The written content below is the most up-to-date information available and may not match what appears in the video segment.

From Cook's Country | August/September 2013

Overview:

Update: April 2014

Bragard, maker of our winning chef's apron, has changed the model number and width of the apron we tested. We purchased the new version and feel it is an acceptable replacement. The apron looks the same, and is now called the Bragard Travail Bib Apron, model number 7590-0256. Although the manufacturer's website says that the apron is now slightly narrower (35 inches wide to the old model's 39 inches) we measured the new apron and it was still 39 inches.

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We waded through a lot of ruffles, pleats, and chintz—and fronts reading “Kiss the Cook”—to round up seven no-nonsense, utilitarian cooks’ aprons in different materials and lengths, priced from $6 to $69. Since grease and other kinds of splatters often land above the waist, we stuck with bib-style aprons. Styles ranged from the most basic, no-pockets, nonadjustable shapes to feature-laden designs such as one that included a towel in its own carrying loop and a built-in corduroy potholder.

We enlisted… read more

Update: April 2014

Bragard, maker of our winning chef's apron, has changed the model number and width of the apron we tested. We purchased the new version and feel it is an acceptable replacement. The apron looks the same, and is now called the Bragard Travail Bib Apron, model number 7590-0256. Although the manufacturer's website says that the apron is now slightly narrower (35 inches wide to the old model's 39 inches) we measured the new apron and it was still 39 inches.

___________________________________________________________

We waded through a lot of ruffles, pleats, and chintz—and fronts reading “Kiss the Cook”—to round up seven no-nonsense, utilitarian cooks’ aprons in different materials and lengths, priced from $6 to $69. Since grease and other kinds of splatters often land above the waist, we stuck with bib-style aprons. Styles ranged from the most basic, no-pockets, nonadjustable shapes to feature-laden designs such as one that included a towel in its own carrying loop and a built-in corduroy potholder.

We enlisted seven test cooks, including men and women of different heights and girths, to try them all on and assess their comfort and fit. Then we assigned each cook one apron to wear for a week in the kitchen. We got the aprons back, along with an earful about what worked and what didn’t. While making a fudgy brownie pie, we saw the advantage of the widest apron of the lot, a 39-inch-wide cotton/linen combination that wrapped completely around all testers and offered handy coverage for chocolate splatters.

Last came our stain-making test: a dousing of yellow mustard, soy sauce, chocolate, and coffee that we let soak into each apron overnight. Not everything came out in the wash. In fact, our winner was the only apron to emerge completely clean in one wash. This was a nice addition to its other advantages of comfort and coverage. With an adjustable neck strap, long strings that wrap around the back to tie in front, and a chest area reinforced with an extra layer of fabric, it was soft but rugged. Its look is pure practicality—which suits us just fine.

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Aprons

A good apron is a kitchen essential. We put seven no-nonsense, utilitarian cooks’ aprons to the test.

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