Grill Tongs

From Cook's Illustrated | June/July 2010

Overview:

To the uninitiated, all grill tongs look the same. But small design nuances have a huge impact on how well tongs handle asparagus or corn, flip a whole chicken, or turn an awkward, floppy rack of ribs on the grill. We bought eight pairs and headed to the backyard to assess how different styles of tongs could handle foods of varying shapes and weights. Tongs are extensions of our arms and hands, and a great pair should work nearly as naturally.

GET A GRIP

The main difference between kitchen and grill tongs is length: Grill tongs must keep us a comfortable distance from the fire. The usable length of these tongs ranged from 13 to 22 inches, but we found that about 16 inches is best. Any longer, and we had to work to lever heavy foods or contort our arms to stand close enough to work over the grill; shorter, and we risked getting scorched.

Our first test was arranging a chimney full of hot coals into a banked fire. We grew sweaty and frustrated with clunky pincers that struggled to get a grip on individual coals or too-springy arms… read more

To the uninitiated, all grill tongs look the same. But small design nuances have a huge impact on how well tongs handle asparagus or corn, flip a whole chicken, or turn an awkward, floppy rack of ribs on the grill. We bought eight pairs and headed to the backyard to assess how different styles of tongs could handle foods of varying shapes and weights. Tongs are extensions of our arms and hands, and a great pair should work nearly as naturally.

GET A GRIP

The main difference between kitchen and grill tongs is length: Grill tongs must keep us a comfortable distance from the fire. The usable length of these tongs ranged from 13 to 22 inches, but we found that about 16 inches is best. Any longer, and we had to work to lever heavy foods or contort our arms to stand close enough to work over the grill; shorter, and we risked getting scorched.

Our first test was arranging a chimney full of hot coals into a banked fire. We grew sweaty and frustrated with clunky pincers that struggled to get a grip on individual coals or too-springy arms that tired our hands. Grilling slim, fragile asparagus spears was a real challenge with bulky or oddly shaped tongs. Two pairs failed miserably, for opposite reasons: One pair featured sharp, turned-up teeth, difficult to slide under individual spears—or any other food. Another pair of tongs were flat. Even the food we managed to grab with them slipped back out. The best models had pincers with shallow, scalloped curves that slid under food and held on—yet didn't gouge.

STRONG-ARM TACTICS

To measure tong strength, we maneuvered whole chickens and full slabs of ribs, monitoring how well tongs lifted and controlled their awkward heft. Two pairs of bulky tongs were strong, but their added weight made the job much more difficult, especially for smaller testers. Other tongs felt flimsy, particularly when ribs cooked to fall-apart tenderness. The best pairs hit the sweet spot between lightweight and sturdy. While the biggest tongs weighed nearly a full pound (for body builders?), our two top-ranked pairs weighed half that.

A little springy tension in tongs is a good thing: It helps you grab and control food. But a few pairs took Hulk-like hand strength, making us work too hard to keep our grip, particularly with delicate foods. Tongs must open wide: One pair opened barely 2 inches—too small for corn, and forget about whole chickens. Some tongs were erratic, badly aligned, and jerky, while successful pairs opened and closed effortlessly. We particularly liked one lock, which we opened single-handedly just by clicking the tab on the handle against our hip. Other tongs lost points for overactive locks that haphazardly stuck during use, a frustrating flaw that can lead to burnt food.

BEST AND WORST

Surprisingly, more than half the tongs we tested failed. Our winning tongs are tough to beat. Our winning manufacturer's other entrant rated lowest: Too short, with flat pincers and a too-narrow opening, they were a flop.

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  • Product Tested

    Results Key:

    Good ★ ★ ★ Fair ★ ★ Poor
  • Prices are subject to change.
  • Highly Recommended - Winner

    OXO Good Grips 16-inch Locking Tongs

    Comfortable, lightweight, and sturdy, these passed every test with top marks. The pincers picked up multiple spears of asparagus in one swoop, cupped corn firmly, and did not damage tender rib meat. One tester said, "I could perform heart surgery with these."

    • Pincers ★★★
    • Tension ★★★
    • Sturdiness ★★★

    $14.99

    BUY NOW Amazon
  • Recommended

    Weber Style Tongs

    Almost identical to our top tongs, these felt comfortable in our hands. Shorter than advertised—a usable length of 16 inches instead of 19, with a 3-inch lock—they gripped ribs, hot coals, and multiple asparagus spears. But the pincers angled inward sharply, cutting into rib meat.

    • Pincers ★★★
    • Tension ★★★
    • Sturdiness ★★

    $10.99

    BUY NOW Amazon
  • Recommended with Reservations

    Kingsford Texas Turner Tongs

    Strong, solid arms made maneuvering heavy items easy; however, several testers objected to their stiff tension and oversize handles. They also locked erratically as we used them, and the sharp lock was uncomfortable to push.

    • Pincers ★★
    • Tension ★★
    • Sturdiness ★★★

    $12

  • Not Recommended

    Outset Rosewood Extra-Long Lock

    We liked this pair’s smooth, ridged wood grip as well as its dexterity at picking up ears of corn. But they were too heavy and long to work comfortably or control smaller items like asparagus, and too big for cooks with smaller hands.

    • Pincers ★★
    • Tension
    • Sturdiness ★★

    $14.95

  • Not Recommended

    Lodge Camp Dutch Oven Tongs

    The lightest and shortest in our lineup, these tongs had a locking bar that constantly slid down. Pincer tips did not align, so picking up asparagus was a challenge, although they gripped ribs and hot coals marginally well. We also knocked off points for stiff and choppy motion.

    • Pincers ★★
    • Tension
    • Sturdiness ★★

    $10.95

  • Not Recommended

    Steven Raichlen 19.5-inch Locking Tongs

    Extra-large pincers were great for holding large slabs of ribs but not so great at picking up thin asparagus. At nearly 1 pound, they were uncomfortably heavy, with unnecessarily large grips and too-tight tension. One tester noted that they felt like exercise equipment.

    • Pincers ★★
    • Tension
    • Sturdiness ★★

    $17.99

  • Not Recommended

    Cuisinart Professional Grill Tongs

    These unusual tongs had pronounced teeth that cut into meat and made getting under ribs and around corn and chicken very difficult. They managed a decent, if shaky, grip on asparagus and coals but felt bulky and awkward. As far as we could tell, the scooper arm was useless.

    • Pincers ★★
    • Tension
    • Sturdiness

    $19.99

  • Not Recommended

    OXO Good Grips BBQ Tongs

    Completely flat pincers slid easily under ribs but failed to grip corn or asparagus without slipping. Opening just over 2 inches, they had to be stretched to grab a chicken. The usable length was just 13 inches.

    • Pincers ★★
    • Tension
    • Sturdiness

    $14.99

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