Reusable Pan Liners

Published November 1, 2007. From Cook's Illustrated.

Overview:

Reusable nonstick baking-pan liners are relatively new and the choices are growing. We baked biscuits, ultrathin lace cookies, and berry-filled tarts on five nonstick liners made from various grades of silicone, silicone-reinforced woven fiberglass, and nonstick fiberglass to see if any could impress us more than a sheet of basic parchment paper.

The liners fell into two classes: lightweights and heavyweights. Baked goods made on lighter liners had bottoms with spotty browning. These liners can be cut to fit any pan, a definite plus, but the flimsy materials creased easily when washed by hand.

Other heavier mats imparted plastic and chemical flavors to the cookies and biscuits. We did find one acceptable liner; however, all of these mats stain over time and can transfer flavors from previous uses. Also, unlike parchment, these mats cannot be cut to fit specific pan sizes. Bottom line: We prefer parchment.

Reusable nonstick baking-pan liners are relatively new and the choices are growing. We baked biscuits, ultrathin lace cookies, and berry-filled tarts on five nonstick liners made from various grades of silicone, silicone-reinforced woven fiberglass, and nonstick fiberglass to see if any could impress us more than a sheet of basic parchment paper.

The liners fell into two classes: lightweights and heavyweights. Baked goods made on lighter liners had bottoms with spotty browning. These liners can be cut to fit any pan, a definite plus, but the flimsy materials creased easily when washed by hand.

Other heavier mats imparted plastic and chemical flavors to the cookies and biscuits. We did find one acceptable liner; however, all of these mats stain over time and can transfer flavors from previous uses. Also, unlike parchment, these mats cannot be cut to fit specific pan sizes. Bottom line: We prefer parchment.

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  • Product Tested

  • Prices are subject to change.
  • Recommended with Reservations

    DeMarle Silpat Silicone Baking Mat

    This reusable liner makes quick work of cleanup. However, the border of the mat flaked off when scratched with a fingernail, and a slight plastic flavor was perceptible during the first few rounds of lace cookies. As we’ve used them in the test kitchen over the past few years, we’ve noticed that stains and odors cling to their surface.

    16.99

  • Not Recommended

    SiliconeZone Standard Baking Mat

    Although this baking mat does help avoid sticky situations and promote even browning and crisp bottoms, it ruined delicate cookies and biscuits by imparting a chemical flavor. Unlike most other mats, berry stains did not wash off this liner.

    15

  • Not Recommended

    KitchenAid Silicone Mat

    Chemical fumes and smoke rolled off this mat each time it exited the oven. Leaky berry juices charred and stained the surface, and the mat was given to buckling, causing uneven cooking.

    14.99

  • Not Recommended

    Regency Wraps Non-Stick Baking Liner

    Cookies were prone to overspreading, but they remained crispy. Pie pastry and biscuits came out with spotty, uneven browning. The large size of the liner and its ability to be cut to size makes it a more versatile option than the other reusable liners. However, this self-dubbed “super parchment” was easily creased even when washed delicately by hand in accordance with the manufacturer’s directions.

    12

  • Not Recommended

    Wilton Baking Mat

    Lace cookies spread to the point of creating one giant cookie, causing some concern as to how this mat alters a recipe’s performance. Biscuits overbrowned, and the heat distribution for the tart was uneven, creating spotty browning. This mat can be cut to fit pans.

    12.99

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